Case Study

Dehcho First Nations

The Dehcho First Nations is a tribal council representing the Dene (South Slavey) and Métis people of the Dehcho Region of the Northwest Territories, Canada. It is made up of ten First Nations bands and two Métis Locals.

The public government for the Dehcho region is based on the Dene principles and traditions of its communities, protecting and promoting the Treaty and our rights. They are focused on the protection of the land and maintaining economic development that balances regional and community interests.

Industry
  • Indigenous
  • Government
Services
  • Strategy
  • Website Development
  • Brand Extension
  • Training
What we did

Strategy, Design and Development for the Dehcho First Nations Website

Ecstatic collaborated with the Dehcho First Nations in the redesign and WordPress CMS implementation of their website. They needed a visual refresh, greater flexibility for their content, and a website they could invest more time in scaling, rather than constantly fixing.

  • Strategy
  • Creative Direction
  • Content Planning + Strategy
  • Brand Extension
  • UX Design
  • Web Development
  • System + Brand Guidelines
  • Training
  • On-going Support
Strategy + Development

The Energy of the Dene and Métis People

It was important to capture the energy of the Dene (South Slavey) and Métis people of the Dehcho Region. Highlighting the land and beauty of the the Northwest Territories and the language — with that in mind, we agreed the priority was to focus on the users and the core features of the site to meet their needs.

An in-depth analysis of the current site and content helped define what we had to work on. We gained a good understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of the site and strategized a plan to improve the experience.

Some of the high-level requests for the site were; implementation of a filtered archival search system and migration of all documentation dating back to 1998, individual community pages, calendar, and in-person training with their entire team in Fort Simpson, Northwest Territories.

See it Live
Process + Planning

Our Development and Design Approach

The biggest challenge going into this project was re-structuring the sitemap to clearly reflect the organizations departments, communities, and vast documentation. Through collaboration and discovery, we developed a structure that worked for their internal workflow and scaling needs.

Developing the sitemap laid-out the structure and organization of the content for the site. We then identified key areas that templates could be re-applied, to streamline those early steps in setting up styles, and to align design and development in a fast paced environment.

We then moved into wireframing variations of the website key pages. During this process, we think about how the content can be structured to satisfy user and client goals in a technically feasible way. The wireframes then serve as a guide for our digital wireframes, and outline all of the features and elements to be incorporated into the design.

The Final Touch

File Conventions + Training in the North

Part of a re-design, the client and their internal team were also seeking guidance on file naming and saving conventions for all documents. We delivered a clear way to organize public documents to match the tagging filters in the archive system, which allowed for easy integration to the online Archive.

In addition to designing the website, Dehcho required on-site training. Members of the Ecstatic team traveled to Fort Simpson, NWT, on two separate occasions to train. It was a rewarding journey to work with the Dehcho team and experience first hand the communities of our great North.

Press

Canada’s new Indigenous Protected Area heralds new era of conservation.

Grand Chief Gladys Norwegian said people in the communities of Fort Providence, Jean Marie River, Fort Simpson and Wrigley have worked hard for decades to protect the massive culturally and ecologically significant area.

“It has been a long time coming, but I was always hopeful,” Norwegian said.

The Narwhal